From Victim to Survivor (2015)

“Contemporary Icarus,” Oil on canvas. 2015. 24 x 30 inches. SOLD
“Perspective (I),” Oil on canvas. 2013. 16 x 18 inches. SOLD.
“Perspective (II),” Oil on canvas. 2015. 24 x 30 inches. SOLD.
“Immortal Sin,” Oil on canvas. 2013. 24 x 30 inches. SOLD.
“Social Persecution,” Oil on canvas. 2014. 24 x 30 inches.
“Conceptual Exposition,” Oil on canvas. 2015. 24 x 30 inches. SOLD.
“Turmoil,” Oil on canvas. 2015. 24 x 30 inches. SOLD.
Untitled. Oil on canvas. 2013. 16 x 20 inches.
“Her Incubus,” Oil on canvas. 2014. 24 x 30 inches.
“Illumination,” Found Objects. 2015. 18 x 18 x 30 inches.
Untitled. Pen on paper. 2014. 8 x 10 inches.
“Isolation,” Pen on paper. 2015. 5 x 8 inches.
“Devoured,” Pen on paper. 2014. 8 x 10 inches.
“Freckles, Scars, and Birthmarks,” Pen on paper. 2015. 8 x 10 inches.
“What a Drag…” Pen on paper. 2014. 36 x 66 inches. SOLD.
“Flowers Bloom,” Pen on paper. 2014. 8 x 10 inches.
“Rise,” Pen on paper. 2015. 5 x 7 inches. SOLD.
“She is,” Pen on paper. 2016. 8 x 5 inches. SOLD.

Artist Statement for Series:

“Within each society there are accepted virtues and faults of the collective body. Some of these issues face debate, but never change. Others are too blasphemous to even acknowledge. Every culture has their taboos. However, when it becomes taboo to even discuss, let alone address a societal fault, humankind fails. We exempt these concepts from public discussion—sometimes subconsciously— fearing the controversy of breaking a long-standing status quo of something that is inherently evil. It seems contradictory, and that is because it is.

Domestic violence, sexual assault, rape: what remains common with these beyond the inhumane acts themselves is the role society plays. As a collective culture, we wish to be ignorant, since reality will burden us. We shame those who wish to speak out. We theorize the faults the victim possesses that could forge them into the wrong over their perpetrators. We choose not to listen, and even more often, not to speak. In truth, society excuses these crimes through passivity. Consequently, victims become perpetually tortured by their environment.

Each painting features a victim, tormented by her own memories, thoughts, or environment. Her face is obstructed, allowing her anonymity to give her protection as well as to elevate her into a symbol of those like her. Though she yearns for freedom, she will never escape the confinement of the canvas.

Pen and ink drawings illustrate moments of stark realities. Isolated moments of courage, desperation, sexual confidence, loneliness, and hope stand alone. The high-contrast nature of these works reflect moments of clarity, even if fleeting.”

Catherine Beaudoin’s 2015 Senior Show Installation at Washington & Jefferson College’s Olin Gallery.

Comments are closed.